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Old 07-27-21, 03:01 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Caring for an Antaresia python

I've been looking into getting a pygmy or stimsons python, but I have a few disabilities. I can successfully care for my fish, cats and dogs with some help from the people I live with, but none of them like snakes so I'd have to be a lot more independent.
My disabilities won't affect my ability to safely handle a snake, but they do affect my energy levels.

I just have a few questions to see if I'd be able to care for a snake by myself, any help would be greatly appreciated.


How long minimum should I spend caring for a single snake per week?

What tasks are most physically demanding? (for example I keep fish and it's physically hard for me to lift large amounts of water while doing water changes)

What tasks are mentally demanding? (using the fish as another example, doing calculations for how much dechlorinator to use can be hard)

What tasks take the longest time?



And this question is unrelated to my disabilities, but does anyone have any recommendations for a natural looking substrate that I could use if I did end up getting one of these guys? I'm finding a lot of contradictory information.
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Old 07-27-21, 09:02 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

I work with Stimson's pythons myself, and find them to be quite easy to care for.
If you are only keeping a single snake, actual time spent per week will be very little. There are two main weekly tasks- feeding and cleaning. Feeding is usually a simple matter of taking a mouse out of the freezer, thawing it under a heat lamp, and giving it to the snake. With the exception of hatchlings, Antaresia are usually eager and reliable eaters.
Cleaning can take a bit longer. If you are using a loose substrate, it's a simple matter of scooping the poop. If you use paper substrate, you change the paper and clean the enclosure as needed. I keep my Stimmies on newspaper in a rack system. Cleaning each one takes me less than five minutes.
You will also want to check their water frequently, as they like to poop in their water dish. When this happens, it must be cleaned right away.
There are no mentally demanding tasks, short of setting up heating and occasionally checking the temperatures in the enclosure.
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Old 07-28-21, 04:01 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

Thank you so much! I'm pretty excited because those sound like things I could manage by myself.

I've heard that they're good eaters which is why I chose them, I didn't know about the pooping in the water containers though, that's something I'll know to look out for now.

A lot of resources I've seen say that I should sanitise everything and completely change the sand, do you know how often I should do that?
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Old 07-28-21, 11:45 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

I don't use sand, so I may not be the right person to answer that question. I would be concerned about the snake ingesting it. However, with loose substrates, most keepers remove the droppings as needed, and replace the substrate when it gets really bad.
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Old 07-28-21, 10:21 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

Thank you again! I'm planning to feed my snake outside the enclosure so hopefully that will reduce the risks of them eating the sand.
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Old 07-29-21, 02:18 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

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Thank you again! I'm planning to feed my snake outside the enclosure so hopefully that will reduce the risks of them eating the sand.
You could also dangle a mouse over a container placed inside the cage. That will reduce stress in the snake. Just be sure to position the prey so that the snake isn't able to pick up any sand along the way (I was listening to a podcast while writing this; I can't multitask well enough to explain how this idea will work).
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Old 08-02-21, 02:08 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

I use aspen bedding for my Anterasia pythons, never heard of using sand for a substrate for those. No need to move the snake to a different container for feeding. If you do use sand though, you can simply put the mouse into a bowl or similar container inside the snake's enclosure for feeding. Baby pythons will be eating small prey like pinkies, and anything too small/young to have its eyes open yet won't get out of even a shallow bowl.
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Old 08-02-21, 06:57 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

Thanks ClockworkBonnet! I get the idea pretty well I think, I've seen it done before at a reptile park. I was wondering why they were holding the mouse so high.

toddnbecka I will not be using live vertebrate prey for any animal. Even zoos in my area aren't allowed to do it.

I think people use sand especially for pygmys because it mimics their natural environment. I'll look into aspen bedding as well though.
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Old 08-09-21, 11:55 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubble View Post
I've been looking into getting a pygmy or stimsons python, but I have a few disabilities. I can successfully care for my fish, cats and dogs with some help from the people I live with, but none of them like snakes so I'd have to be a lot more independent.
My disabilities won't affect my ability to safely handle a snake, but they do affect my energy levels.

I just have a few questions to see if I'd be able to care for a snake by myself, any help would be greatly appreciated.


How long minimum should I spend caring for a single snake per week?

What tasks are most physically demanding? (for example I keep fish and it's physically hard for me to lift large amounts of water while doing water changes)

What tasks are mentally demanding? (using the fish as another example, doing calculations for how much dechlorinator to use can be hard)

What tasks take the longest time?



And this question is unrelated to my disabilities, but does anyone have any recommendations for a natural looking substrate that I could use if I did end up getting one of these guys? I'm finding a lot of contradictory information.
Lot's of great info above, but I'll just throw in my 2 cents worth.

When it comes to care it terms of cleaning; spot clean once a week (removing faeces etc), full clean once a month (remove substrate, disinfect etc), feeding depends on how old the snake is. A young snake will eat once a week whereas an adult will eat once a month. Handling; as much or as less as you want. Snakes unlike other animals do not enjoy being handled therefore leaving it in it's enclosure for extended weeks won't be an issue

I would say the most physically demanding task (if it is rather demanding at all) is simply setting up the enclosure and putting everything in it.

The most mentally demanding task is trying to come up with a name for your snake. Takes me days lol

Which tasks take the longest time? I would say full cleaning.

Also I would definitely start with a stimson as they are easy to acquire and one of the easiest snakes to care for. Pygmies can make a terrible beginner snake as they can be extremely hard to get feeding (and often die as a result) and they are very hard to come by in the reptile industry.

And yes aspen is a good choice. I would never use desert sand as it poses too much of a risk to the snake and is pretty damn expensive too.
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Old 08-10-21, 07:30 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

Thanks Pythonguy1

Pygmies are surprisingly easy to get where I live, because there's a breeder nearby who seems to like them.
But I definitely want to make sure I can feed it properly, so I'll go with the stimsons, and the aspen bedding.

Naming things never takes me too long, but knowing me I'll probably use baby-talk when even thinking about the snake anyway...
People at reptile parks always give me weird looks when I start calling a death adder a silly squiggle, but they're just so cute.

Now I just have to convince the people I live with that the snake won't actually bother them...

If setting up an enclosure is anything like setting up a fish tank I'll probably enjoy it, I have lots of fun arranging things.
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Old 08-10-21, 08:15 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

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Originally Posted by Bubble View Post
Thanks Pythonguy1

Pygmies are surprisingly easy to get where I live, because there's a breeder nearby who seems to like them.
But I definitely want to make sure I can feed it properly, so I'll go with the stimsons, and the aspen bedding.

Naming things never takes me too long, but knowing me I'll probably use baby-talk when even thinking about the snake anyway...
People at reptile parks always give me weird looks when I start calling a death adder a silly squiggle, but they're just so cute.

Now I just have to convince the people I live with that the snake won't actually bother them...

If setting up an enclosure is anything like setting up a fish tank I'll probably enjoy it, I have lots of fun arranging things.
When I first got into snakes I went crazy with arranging the enclosures with branches and rocks and stuff. Nowadays most of my enclosures are pretty simple but it's always a good idea to try different setups to see what the snake likes
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Old 08-21-21, 05:24 AM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

Hey Bubble! I'm getting my Stimsons next weekend (damn covid quarantine!) so will be joining you in the new snake parent group the other good thing about antaresia is they don't require big enclosures, so it shouldnt be too hard apart form getting the enclosure where you want it. Hope to see pics of your noodle with a head when you get it!!
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Old 09-02-21, 05:08 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Re: Caring for an Antaresia python

I would like to reply to your post. I am a brand new member but can't see how to post something. Can you help me?
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