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Old 10-04-13, 12:52 AM   #361 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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I agree with the above about ceramic heat emitters being a more difficult option. Also, in every case where I tried to implement one, it dried the air out and killed the humidity significantly more than a halogen bulb.
precisely why monitor keepers in general dont use them that and CHEs are quite frankly dangerous if your stat fails... they overheat extremely extremely quickly
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Old 10-04-13, 01:28 AM   #362 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

just to say I switched back to Halogens pretty quickly - the Ceramic was only suitable for covering a small area, which my Sav had ougrown with a couple of weeks, and my Sav was not getting the humidity he needed in that enclosure - GU10's where used until he was 2.5months (give or take birth>sale age) and E27's since then


not sure what thermostats fail in the ON position, i've yet to come across that issue myself? seems like an absurd design flaw, which makes do this?
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Old 10-04-13, 04:08 AM   #363 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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just to say I switched back to Halogens pretty quickly - the Ceramic was only suitable for covering a small area, which my Sav had ougrown with a couple of weeks, and my Sav was not getting the humidity he needed in that enclosure - GU10's where used until he was 2.5months (give or take birth>sale age) and E27's since then


not sure what thermostats fail in the ON position, i've yet to come across that issue myself? seems like an absurd design flaw, which makes do this?
All of them can. Once your probe goes whacko, anything can happen....
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Old 10-04-13, 04:40 AM   #364 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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All of them can. Once your probe goes whacko, anything can happen....
Ive only used microclimate and habistat, and they have all failed ''Off'' when they did eventually go, is there any more specific info you can give me? because it seems to me that this is a pretty major flaw in the design if this is happening - i've heard it mentioned, but only on this forum in the last few months
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Old 10-04-13, 05:00 AM   #365 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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Ive only used microclimate and habistat, and they have all failed ''Off'' when they did eventually go, is there any more specific info you can give me? because it seems to me that this is a pretty major flaw in the design if this is happening - i've heard it mentioned, but only on this forum in the last few months
Again, not talking about the stat itself. I'm sure there is a fail safe like you are talking about so they turn off. I'm simply referring to the probe going haywire. When any of these probes are exposed to extreme heat or cold or whatever, they tend to stop working. Now, the stat still works, but if the probe is reading 40 degrees F then you will have a problem....
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Old 10-07-13, 11:47 AM   #366 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

I was using a Zoomed thermostat that stuck on all the time. Just a light thump and it would turn off. Never had a problem coming on, but it damn near cooked my sav a few times (120 ambient). Until I moved it to my blackthroat enclosure (after working on it and mounting it differently)and he ripped the probe off. It's now in the county landfill. Since then I have just played with different wattage lights and combinations and locations until I got my enclosures to stay consistent where they should be.
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Old 10-11-13, 10:39 AM   #367 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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precisely why monitor keepers in general dont use them that and CHEs are quite frankly dangerous if your stat fails... they overheat extremely extremely quickly

Honesly, I have never had an issue with CME's for my monitor enclosures, but i definitely think that the stat quality is a huge factor. I'm not opposed to UV but if i do I use them in the winter combined with UVB'. However, when my monitor is gravid and i'm using the night bulb in which case i use a lower wattage CME and omit the uvb ( just my strategy). I think opinions will always vary on this topic. I have found that using commercial grad timers, thermostats, etc. increases the life of CME's I actually don't purchase any enclosure equipment from pet stores or pet supplies manufactures I feel that this has greatly lessened the likely hood of failure. I mean that's what works for me though over the past 13 years.

Also since CME's have gained popularity like anything else manufacture have sacrificed quality for quantity. The last CME I had ran for 12 months on a 12 hour timer. Now I'm lucky if i get 6 months...ugh...
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Old 10-14-13, 05:32 PM   #368 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

I use a 100w CHE with my Red Tail Boa on a dimmer, and have been able to maintain temps and humidity in her aquarium. I work from home, and keep my animals in the office. Or more accurately, keep my work station in the exotics room. I check temps daily, and look over each and every animal enclosure more than once per day, and have for the past few years.

I read everything I can and make up my own mind. If something doesnt work, I do more research and change it. Aquariums arent ideal for monitors, CHEs may not be ideal for monitors. But if your handy enough you can make it work for you and your monitor lizard.
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Old 10-15-13, 10:25 AM   #369 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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Originally Posted by TarantulaSteve View Post
I use a 100w CHE with my Red Tail Boa on a dimmer, and have been able to maintain temps and humidity in her aquarium. I work from home, and keep my animals in the office. Or more accurately, keep my work station in the exotics room. I check temps daily, and look over each and every animal enclosure more than once per day, and have for the past few years.

I read everything I can and make up my own mind. If something doesnt work, I do more research and change it. Aquariums arent ideal for monitors, CHEs may not be ideal for monitors. But if your handy enough you can make it work for you and your monitor lizard.


Hi, I suspect your snake doesn`t need or use a surface temp between approx. 50 to 60c+, the CHE`s are NOT suitable for creating these temps at the basking site simply because the heat is directed all around as previously stated, they also dry out the air to a much greater extent than for example the relatively low wattage halogen (flood) bulbs, though I have and still do use them for raising the ambient temps at times (during the night, very cold weather).
It would be good if you could explain how you provide those basking temps with CHE`s, and also how you control the humidity range in your Varanid enclosures if you primarily use those (size of enclosure, wattages, distance from animal/s, etc)? Thanks!
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Old 10-16-13, 02:52 PM   #370 (permalink)
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Exclamation Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

Hello everyone!

Here is my past enclosure projects.II hire an electrician for my enclosures I'm a big believer in paying the experts to handle wiring didn't want to be bothered with it. This is the old enclosure and is 8' x 4' x 4' I was testing out filtration and her lay patterns.

I'm currently building a mega (MAN CAVE style..lol enclosure 8' x 8' x 11' with all the trimmings now). I'll have photos of the building process of that one soon. I have added a strong filtration system for my Varanus Ornatus as well that i tested on the old enclosure no more daily water changes !!!!!!!!. Does anyone else have enclosure pics to share; would love to see them?

P.S. my female varanus is Gravid right now; not over fed...lol
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Old 11-13-13, 07:25 PM   #371 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

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Originally Posted by murrindindi View Post
Hi, I suspect your snake doesn`t need or use a surface temp between approx. 50 to 60c+, the CHE`s are NOT suitable for creating these temps at the basking site simply because the heat is directed all around as previously stated, they also dry out the air to a much greater extent than for example the relatively low wattage halogen (flood) bulbs, though I have and still do use them for raising the ambient temps at times (during the night, very cold weather).
It would be good if you could explain how you provide those basking temps with CHE`s, and also how you control the humidity range in your Varanid enclosures if you primarily use those (size of enclosure, wattages, distance from animal/s, etc)? Thanks!
Hi there, Im actually just finishing off a new enclosure and am hoping to get pics up soon, but will post that later.

Since this is a monitor enclosure discussion thread, I would like to respectfully address what has been previously stated about CHE's. I'm not an expert, so I apologize for the very long post.

CHE's and Halogens work by the same principle. They turn electricity into UV Radiation. The halogen produces light and heat. The CHE just produces heat. This distinction is muddled by the fact that depending on a materials make-up, they can absorb light, which is "stored" as heat. (A dark rock will become hotter in the sunlight than a lighter coloured piece of rock, which will reflect some light which we then perceive as colour.)

To this end, a 60w halogen and 60w CHE will roughly produce the same amount of heat.

Heat travels in three ways. Radiation, Conduction and Convection. We are only concerned with Radiation and Conduction.

Take the temp of the face of your basking bulb. My 65w Halogens are between 325F and 365F, and my 100w CHE has readings between 464F and "Error" (+700F).

Heat travels by radiation in that a warm surface will emit IR at a perpendicular angle towards a colder surface. The much hotter temperature of the face of the bulb is radiating IR straight down to the colder surface of the basking rock. When you place your hand under a basking bulb you are feeling the IR being emitted from the hot bulb to your colder hand. There is far more going on than, "The air is warmer here." Now, the air does have a temp as well, but we really dont need to get into that right now.

Under my CHE, I have a basking rock with surface area 3-4x larger than the face of the CHE. As the CHE radiates heat downwards, CONDUCTION will allow heat to move between objects in contact. So IR hits ~25% of the rock, and since the rock is always in contact with itself, it will attempt to equalize its entire temperature. I use a uniform thickness rock and it does have a perfect temp the entire length of the rock. IE. Directly under the bulb is the same temp as the edges of the rock.


Now, take the temperature of the neck of your bulbs. My 65w Halogens have surface temps between 239F and 296F , and my 100w CHE between 286F and 596F, getting hotter the closer I get to the face. The CHE is a heated coil starting and stopping at the base, with the majority of the coil in a spiral position on the face of the bulb. Its not an aesthetic design, but intended to direct the majority of the heat in the desired direction.
So while there is some "bleed off" with the CHE emitting heat in directions not where you want, we see a similar effect with the Halogens. There are a couple different types of outer core you can find on Halogens, and without testing the styles I dont have, I cant know if one is any better than another in terms of heat efficiency. Im under the impression the bulbs were designed with light output and heat dissipation as the only considerations. Not its ability to direct heat, but again I could be wrong. Ive seen some marketed as "heat bulbs", but dont know if it plays on halogens normal ability to produce heat, or if outer core design will actually reflect additional IR.


When people talk about humidity, they are really referring to relative humidity (rH) which is the % of water vapour in the air, compared to its full saturation level. Humidity is a measurement of water vapour, generally given as parts per million(ppm).
Warmer air can hold more water vapour than colder. So as you heat the air, rH will go down. Humidity levels will always try to equalize themselves. To give you an example, when your outside in the winter you can see your warm humid breath in the air. As the with every dry breath in, you expel humid air from your lungs, as they “bleed” vapour to the dry air you breath in. This is also how lizards dehydrate. Tarantulas and a variety of invertebrates have books lungs which passively absorb oxygen from outside the body, and preferably humid oxygen so they don’t desiccate.

The water vapour will never disappear. The warm air rises and continues to draw in more and more vapour the warmer and higher it gets. It sucks in vapour from the surrounding cooler air, which in turns draws in water vapour from its colder surrounding area, and so on. When the air hits the roof and can no longer heat up, and as reached its desired saturation level, it will slowly make its way to the opposing end of the enclosure, spreading its warmth and vapour in a never ending attempt to perfectly equalize. As the warm humid air hits the relatively cold glass, the air quickly cools and suddenly has an excess of water vapour. This is deposited on the glass as droplets of water, which will eventually slide down to be reabsorbed by the soil where it can start the cycle all over.
Unless I misread something, Varanid keepers don’t add ventilation to the enclosures. Humidity will escape along the sliding glass doors, and any possible cracks that weren’t sealed. As well as everytime you open the enclosure. It is possible for water vapour to pass through dense objects but this is a part of physics that I am stuck on. The point is, in a properly built enclosure humidity is very easy to maintain, and relative humidity is affected by temperature not the heating device itself.

I truly wish I had a halogen and CHE of same wattage. My figures would make a lot more sence than that.

If you made it this far, thanks, and I hope this info helps people with their future enclosure designs. I will be sharing mine shortly.
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Old 02-01-14, 06:51 PM   #372 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

hey guys, I will shortly be setting up a large enclosure for a tree monitor and would like to line the walls of the enclosure with a substance that will allow the monitor even more climbing space.
I have seen cork sheets, cork tiles and coco fiber sheets recommended and I was wondering if anyone had any experience with any of those? My concern with the coco fiber is them getting their toenails caught, but I haven't read of this happening.
Keep in mind tree monitors need 70-100% humidity. Thanks.
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Old 02-01-14, 07:47 PM   #373 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

[QUOTE=psychocircus;900743]hey guys, I will shortly be setting up a large enclosure for a tree monitor and would like to line the walls of the enclosure with a substance that will allow the monitor even more climbing space.
I have seen cork sheets, cork tiles and coco fiber sheets recommended and I was wondering if anyone had any experience with any of those? My concern with the coco fiber is them getting their toenails caught, but I haven't read of this happening.
Keep in mind tree monitors need 70-100% humidity. Thanks.[/Q]

I haven't used coco fiber sheets, there is another type of sheeting though. Can't think of the name.

Cork tiles are good, the cork that comes in rolls is really crappy, practically falls apart before you can use any of it.

You could also use spray foam, and then coat it with some sort of epoxy and mix a coco-husk, sand mixture and put it over that. NEherpetological has a section about it on their site with a how-to.

You could purchase backgrounds from universalrock. Or if you want a lot of useable space and have no funds, grab a bunch of vines, and twigs, and put them all over the place.
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Old 02-01-14, 08:01 PM   #374 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

[QUOTE=smy_749;900750]
Quote:
Originally Posted by psychocircus View Post
hey guys, I will shortly be setting up a large enclosure for a tree monitor and would like to line the walls of the enclosure with a substance that will allow the monitor even more climbing space.
I have seen cork sheets, cork tiles and coco fiber sheets recommended and I was wondering if anyone had any experience with any of those? My concern with the coco fiber is them getting their toenails caught, but I haven't read of this happening.
Keep in mind tree monitors need 70-100% humidity. Thanks.[/Q]

I haven't used coco fiber sheets, there is another type of sheeting though. Can't think of the name.

Cork tiles are good, the cork that comes in rolls is really crappy, practically falls apart before you can use any of it.

You could also use spray foam, and then coat it with some sort of epoxy and mix a coco-husk, sand mixture and put it over that. NEherpetological has a section about it on their site with a how-to.

You could purchase backgrounds from universalrock. Or if you want a lot of useable space and have no funds, grab a bunch of vines, and twigs, and put them all over the place.
thanks for the tips. I was leaning towards the cork tiles. I'm not extremely creative so that is a fairly simple choice.
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Old 02-04-14, 11:24 PM   #375 (permalink)
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Re: Monitor enclosure discussion thread

Hello Guys,


So I have a question I have build a tree monitor enclosure and I am just working out the humidity and the heat for a few weeks before my monitors arrive. I used large branches I collected myself as well as a lot of moss for the hide boxes. The cage looks great florescent lighting and halogens for the heat. 2 hides and ordered a bunch of cork bark tubes and half tubes.


My question is the maple branches have white spots and moss on them, they look like lichen to me as the tree was alive. My question is if this in any way can harm my monitors. I will attach a picture of the enclosure and the logs in question. I am against bleaching woods and feel that our forests should not have any harmful things that will bother my monitors. But I want to be 100% sure as these guys are my pride and joy and have been waiting a long time to get these animals.
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