border
sSNAKESs : Reptile Forum
 

Go Back   sSNAKESs : Reptile Forum > Community Forums > New to the forum?

Notices

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-03-18, 10:49 PM   #1 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan-2018
Location: Masachusetts
Posts: 37
Country:
Hello All

Hello Everyone,

I just picked up my very first snake on the first of the year. Approximately 1 year old Sand Boa.

Still trying to figure a few things out and fretting over what I'm sure are the little things.
1) Aspen vs Sand
2) Thermostat Probe Placement
3) First feed (he was fed in front of me the day before purchasing and ate well.)
4) Name for the beasty.

As with any good parent I want my guy to be happy and well taken care of.
CameraSkunk is offline  
Login to remove ads
Old 01-04-18, 07:45 AM   #2 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Feb-2017
Age: 59
Posts: 1,264
Country:
Re: Hello All

Welcome to sSNAKESs!!!

Can't help with SBs, but there are many others here that can. I'm sure they'll chime in soon.
__________________
2.5.4 Boidae | 4.7.13 Colubridae | 2.3.6 Pythonidae | 3.0.0 Canis lupus familiaris | 1.0.0 Homo Sapiens Sapiens Stultus
Scubadiver59 is offline  
Old 01-04-18, 07:52 AM   #3 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan-2018
Location: Masachusetts
Posts: 37
Country:
Re: Hello All

Thanks. Its also partially the New Husbandry jitters I'm sure. Research only does so much, though is in my opinion important, but eventually you have to bite the bullet and dive in.
CameraSkunk is offline  
Old 01-04-18, 08:00 AM   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: May-2017
Location: Wichita, Kansas
Age: 57
Posts: 58
Country:
Re: Hello All

Welcome aboard and I too have never owned a sand boa. Pretty cool little creatures though. Hopefully some of the sand boa owners will jump in and share some their experiences and suggestions.
StevenL is offline  
Old 01-04-18, 10:31 AM   #5 (permalink)
Member
 
DJC Reptiles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct-2017
Posts: 403
Country:
Re: Hello All

You can use either aspen chips, or sand, it doesn't matter. Don't use aspen snake bedding as it doesn't allow them to borrow very well (although many people have found success with this, aspen chips act more like sand). I recommend 4-6" of substrate, but up to 8" is not unheard of. More then that and your going to have a tough time finding your pet. I don't know where you could place the probe however. I would place an UTH on under one side of the cage, while having a heat lamp over the cage to heat the air. The heat lamp should create surface temperatures under the light at about 95°F. The UTH should just be left on, the snake will be able to thermoregulate with this setup. The light should be on during the day only, while the UTH should be on 24/7. Even the largest sand boas will never need an enclosure larger then a 10 gallon with a secure lid. For feeding, if it is a female, you can feed a dry, frozen thawed hopper mouse. If a male, you should feed a fuzzy mouse. This is because of the gender size difference, although I am not completely sure of the size of your boa? Feed whatever leaves no, to just a slight bulge. You can start feeding your pet a week from when you received it to give it time to acclimate to it's environment. After that feeding can start every 7 days. Once an adult (2-3 years old), your sand boa can eat once every 10-14 days. That is good news he ate well, most keepers don't ask to see the animal eat, but is very important. As for a name, I am not sure, after all I don't know the species of sand boa, or morph. Make sure to reply to those and I'll help you out .
__________________
____________________________________________
I am no expert. I’m just knowledgeable in reptiles, I’ll do my best to help you.
-DJCReptiles
“The Only Difference Between Fear and Respect is Knowledge”(Daniel Jensen).
DJC Reptiles is offline  
Login to remove ads
Old 01-04-18, 12:01 PM   #6 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan-2018
Location: Masachusetts
Posts: 37
Country:
Re: Hello All

Thanks DJS and others I appreciate the advise. I'm strongly considering switching to sand. As was mentioned the aspen snake bedding seems to be just OK for his burrowing and Sand would be I think easier to spot clean given the species sub terrain preference. As far as I can tell he is male, been researching on how to figure out gender by visual, I don't like the idea of probing. I do have a small halogen light for daylight over the tank (10 gal). Still it doesn't heat the tank much so a small (thinking 25wat) heater might be added. Trying to figure out what will fit and keep the hot spot centered to maintain that heat radiant for thermal regulation.

The request to see an animal eat is a practice I built from Fresh and Marine fish. I had these for a long time, one tank blew a leak on me (the salt water so it wasn't something I could set up a new tank quickly) and the freshwater tank I had tetras that were probably 6 years old the heater failed in the ON position. So that was heart breaking. Snakes were always an interest so here we are.

So far I like the ability to interact with the pet too but its always that learning curve that makes me nervous. I do not want to harm any animal. (Mind you the feeding I understand this is nature. It's more about the animal should not come to any harm because of my negligence.)
CameraSkunk is offline  
Old 01-04-18, 01:51 PM   #7 (permalink)
Member
 
DJC Reptiles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct-2017
Posts: 403
Country:
Re: Hello All

I understand, keep in mind sand boas are great starter species that are very hardy and forgiving. Just make sure you keep the temps right (I recommend buying an infrared temp gun to be sure), and you won't have to worry. Snakes are addicting, when I got my first snake in November, I was able to convince my Mom for another one just the day after Christmas. Ever since then, I have absolutely loved reptiles (I did before, but keeping them made me love them even more), and continue to do all I can to research not just snakes, but all herptiles. I wish you luck with yours, I am sure you will do great!
__________________
____________________________________________
I am no expert. I’m just knowledgeable in reptiles, I’ll do my best to help you.
-DJCReptiles
“The Only Difference Between Fear and Respect is Knowledge”(Daniel Jensen).
DJC Reptiles is offline  
Old 01-04-18, 02:09 PM   #8 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan-2018
Location: Masachusetts
Posts: 37
Country:
Re: Hello All

Thanks DJC. Thats one of the reasons I picked the Sand Boa for a starter. I doubt it will be my last. I'd already think once I settle on some things with this guy I'd love to do a tropical species as well to get something more displayable as well.

I had the sand boa out for a bit earlier and adjusted the thermostat probe for the UTH. I actually put a reptile mat on the bottom, under the substrate. So I put the probe under the mat and set the thermostat to the higher range of what the Sand Boa likes, then positioned the Light above the same spot so the hot spot will heat from both directions. That way when the light turns off I'll get the cooler nighttime temperatures as well. All the while the mat keeps him from disturbing the probe.
CameraSkunk is offline  
Old 01-04-18, 11:05 PM   #9 (permalink)
Member
 
DJC Reptiles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct-2017
Posts: 403
Country:
Re: Hello All

I should state that I did not get my snakes last year, I got them both awhile ago. I re-read it and it that's the way it looks.
__________________
____________________________________________
I am no expert. I’m just knowledgeable in reptiles, I’ll do my best to help you.
-DJCReptiles
“The Only Difference Between Fear and Respect is Knowledge”(Daniel Jensen).
DJC Reptiles is offline  
Old 01-05-18, 05:40 PM   #10 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Aug-2003
Location: California
Age: 36
Posts: 360
Country:
Re: Hello All

Hi there! I also have a sand boa I've had my new little guy for about 3 months now. He's still young and tiny. My first snake years ago... was a sand boa. Males can be kept in a 10, females get bigger and heftier and would do better in something a little larger. Feeder sizes, I've heard many different things, like males will get big enough for a hopper. I've seen males big enough for hoppers without being fat.
Oh one thing, add plants on the surface might encourage your sand boa to explore more. In the wild they can often be found right underneath things. I keep mine on lizard litter, not dusty as aspen, but holds tunnels better than sand. Oh and probing is not really needed with these guys since you can visually sex them. I think everything else has been covered.
My guy has been a really good feeder for me, so far. So I haven't had to try any of the tricks people mention to get a tricky eater to eat.
Magdalen is offline  
Login to remove ads
Old 01-05-18, 08:47 PM   #11 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jan-2018
Location: Masachusetts
Posts: 37
Country:
Re: Hello All

Magdalen, thanks for the welcome.

Based on a number of pictures i've looked at between tail size on females and tail size on males I'm 90% positive its a male.

I had my first feeding attempt today and he went right for it no problem. The shop I got him from said he was eating frozen thawed hoppers before I picked him up, and he handled one without an issue so that was one anxiety down. Size wise I'd say its close as far as comparing the snakes body size to the rodent but once he got it down to his tummy you couldn't tell he had eaten. It really is an amazing thing to watch.

I did notice some interesting behavior as of the last 24 hours. He seems to be hanging out above substrait occasionally. That is until he notices me then he slips on back into the sand. I did transition him back to sand, which is what they had him in at the store. I'll admit it was a bit selfish as far as cleaning up after him in the long run. It seems there is a 50/50 split on is Sand right, is Aspen right, or other. So observe and make up my own opinion I guess.
CameraSkunk is offline  
Old 01-05-18, 11:39 PM   #12 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Aug-2003
Location: California
Age: 36
Posts: 360
Country:
Re: Hello All

Yeah I find they are good feeders for the most part. Pretty easy keepers. My guy wanted to eat right away. Also that behavior is usual of them looking for food. I find they get active when the lights are out and no ones around judging by all the tracks in the bedding.
And yes you're correcting about the sand vs aspen. Basically comes down to personal preference. Their poop is actually not that bad. Small and dry.
Magdalen is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:25 PM.

Powered by vBulletin®
©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2002-17, Hobby Solutions Inc.

right

SEO by vBSEO 3.1.0