border
sSNAKESs : Reptile Forum
 

Go Back   sSNAKESs : Reptile Forum > Community Forums > General Discussion

Notices

Closed Thread
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-01-04, 11:13 AM   #1 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: outside of the box
Age: 50
Posts: 377
Talking boa or python?

Okay, I'm looking for information about boas and pythons....I figure that this is definately the place to find it.

I would like as many opinions as possible~~

Which of the two make a better pet and why?

What I'm looking for is an animal that won't get too large and has a decent temperament.

I am a new snake keeper and would like to ~eventually~ own a boa or python. I have two corns now.

Thanks for any help!


tree
treegirl is offline  
Login to remove ads
Old 07-01-04, 11:22 AM   #2 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Apr-2003
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Age: 30
Posts: 5,325
Send a message via ICQ to Bartman
Well just saying boa's vs pythons has an extremely large area of different sizes.

By what your saying you want I would deffinetly suggest a ball python. They dont get to big, but a good size, and 99.9 % of them are completely tame/calm. Ive never seen a ball bite unless you smell like a mouse/rat lol.

Also if you have the space and money to buy it, Id also suggest a type of boa constrictor. They are amazing, great feeding response, something ball's dont have (most of the time) and are also usually very calm snakes as a whole. My friend has two and they are both jsut great snakes but require a lot..big tanks and big meals as they grow.
__________________
Adam
Bartman is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 11:25 AM   #3 (permalink)
Banned
 
Kevin McRae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: Manitoba
Age: 27
Posts: 637
Country:
Send a message via MSN to Kevin McRae
I suggest a small python, there usally best for beginners, a ball python was my first pythona nd childerns pythons/spotteds are also good.
Kevin McRae is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 11:46 AM   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
CHRISANDBOIDS14's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct-2003
Location: Edmonton, AB
Age: 27
Posts: 1,737
Send a message via MSN to CHRISANDBOIDS14
Rosy Boas are also small(2-3ft). If you do a google search of "boas vs. pythons" or "boas and pythons" you should come up with some websites with some info on them.

C.
__________________
0.2 Bloods for Sale. Adult and juvinile. PM me for details.
Cheers!
Chris
CHRISANDBOIDS14 is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 11:49 AM   #5 (permalink)
hhw
Member
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: Vancouver, B.C.
Age: 36
Posts: 345
What you're looking for has more to do with a given species than whether it's a boa or python. Note that males are usually a fair bit smaller than females, so if size is a concern you should make sure you get a male.

A Ball Python is a commonly kept beginner python, but I would suggest that you do your research well as they are a bit tougher than corn snakes. They can go off feed easily if stressed, so you need to make sure you maintain the right conditions. Also, make sure you get a captive bred one from a reputable breeder.

Personally, if you go with a boa (boa constrictor imperator), I would avoid the more common localities, which can get quite large (10-12 feet). Hogg Island and Sonoran Desert varieties only get to around 6 feet, but are a bit more expensive and difficult to find. Cay Caulker and Cay Crawls are smaller still, but similarly more difficult to find.
__________________
1.0 Pastel Ball Python, 1.9 Normal Ball Pythons, 0.1 African House Snake, 1.0 Savannah Monitor, 0.0.1 Argentinian Horned Frog
hhw is offline  
Login to remove ads
Old 07-01-04, 01:46 PM   #6 (permalink)
Member
 
Jeff_Favelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar-2002
Location: BC
Posts: 9,740
Send a message via AIM to Jeff_Favelle Send a message via MSN to Jeff_Favelle Send a message via Yahoo to Jeff_Favelle
Good post hhw.
__________________
www.jefffavelle.com
Jeff_Favelle is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 01:52 PM   #7 (permalink)
Former Moderator no longer active
 
Join Date: Feb-2002
Location: Christchurch
Posts: 10,251
Country:
The differences between boas and pythons are really irrelevant to being kept as pets, as both come in a variety of different sizes, shapes, temperaments, colours, etc.

If you are looking for something small that is pretty tolerant of handling I would suggest a Spotted Python, Children's Python, Rosy Boa, or Sand Boa. They are all easy to care for and don't get easily stressed out from handling. Ball Pythons can be another choice, but only if you can deal with their fasting and sometimes finicky eating habits. They do stress quite easily, and the fact that they are often quite still while being held isn't an expression of being comfortable, but rather being defensive. Some smaller Boa constrictors can also be a good choice. There are quite a few that stay under 6' in length and are typically good feeders and quite hardy. A male Brazilian or Colombian Rainbow Boa might also be a good choice. Although they are quite strong for their size, they are typically easy to calm down and are excellent feeders. However, they are quite sensitive to their humidity requirements, but given the correct enclosure, are very easy to maintain.
Linds is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 04:14 PM   #8 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: outside of the box
Age: 50
Posts: 377
The Brazilian Rainbows are so gorgeous.
treegirl is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 06:54 PM   #9 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: Windsor, ON
Age: 33
Posts: 206
brb's can be pretty tempermental and love to hide, so if you want a snake you'll see out a lot a Brazilian isn't it. the nippy factor is also what turns most people off too. good size though (i think it was 6-9' average, correct me if i'm wrong) and can be a little pricy for a beginner.
__________________
Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction.
emilsmee is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 07:01 PM   #10 (permalink)
Member
 
jjnnbns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan-2004
Location: Fargo, ND
Age: 36
Posts: 582
Send a message via MSN to jjnnbns
I've never heard of a 9' brazilian, nor have I heard of them being nippy. I have a great pair both right around 5 feet and very nice snakes. They do require LOTS more care than a corn however. A brb needs high humidity and you must make sure that the temps do not get too high.

Emilsmee is right about their hiding though. They are almost always hidden away except for a few glimpses you may catch of them out at night.

I would suggest a carpet python (I love JCPs) as they usually calm with age, and the nippy-ness as young will not cause any damage...

Brent Strande
__________________
Brent Strande

0.1 Corn Snake (Anery), 1.1 JCP (High Yellow), 1.1 BRB, 1.0 Albino BCI, 0.1 Het Albino BCI, 1.0 GTP (Jayapura type)

www.freewebs.com/brentstrande
jjnnbns is offline  
Login to remove ads
Old 07-01-04, 08:23 PM   #11 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Posts: 1,109
i would say that a BRB is not a beginner snake, due to its relative intolerance towards husandry mistakes. i would also avoid a central american boa constrictor, as they are certainly the most agressive of the BC locals. as others have said before, ball python (cept for the fasting), rosy boa (i personally find that they are not very interesting) or any of the antaresia species (my personal suggestion). if u can care for corn snakes, you can care for antaresia, and they are quite docile, and more interesting to watch than the more sedentary species afformentioned. also, i really enjoy working with sand boas, but they are not to everyones taste. as a beginner, try to avoid arboreal species as they tend to be less tolerant of handling and require more complicated care. just my 2 cents.
thunder is offline  
Old 07-01-04, 09:14 PM   #12 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: Windsor, ON
Age: 33
Posts: 206
yeah i was guessing on the length, i've seen 7ft so i figured there must be some above and below, and this one was fairly young. about the nippiness, i was told that by a friend who breeds these guys. he's spent a couple minutes everyday holding his because they were his fave of his breeding projects and he said out of all of his, all got meaner as they got older no matter how much time he spent with them (thats actually why I havent gotten any yet) and same with his friends BRB's....
__________________
Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction.
emilsmee is offline  
Old 07-02-04, 10:28 AM   #13 (permalink)
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun-2004
Location: outside of the box
Age: 50
Posts: 377
hey--

thanks so much for all the responses so far. ~Very~ helpful info! I appreciate that totally!

I think my next snake will be a Nelson Milk, which I'm going to try to get in September. I do want to get a lot more experience under my belt before I move on to a boa or python. All of your input really gave me much to think about.

Gawd, I love this forum!

thanxs!

tree
treegirl is offline  
Old 07-02-04, 01:35 PM   #14 (permalink)
Former Moderator no longer active
 
Join Date: Feb-2002
Location: Christchurch
Posts: 10,251
Country:
emilsmee and treegirl,
BRB are actually quite manageable snakes. Most babies can be nippy, but with regfular handling they are quite easy to calm down. I would consider aggressive adults to be more of the exception. Even if they aren't handled a lot as adults, if they had a decent base for handling as babies, they should remain docile. Although the humidity and temperature requirements are quite specific, they are very easy to keep as long as they are setup right in the beginning. This is from both my own experiences working with these snakes, as well as reputable breeders of these beautiful snakes. Although they get around 5-7 feet in length, they are quite slender and seem nowhere near that size. Males typically stay around 5 or so feet.
Linds is offline  
Old 07-02-04, 02:26 PM   #15 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: May-2003
Location: New York
Age: 43
Posts: 433
First off, what is your budget for this new pet? If your willing to invest @ $200, then I personally would get a Hog Island boa. They are beautiful and are a joy to keep. They only get around 5 or 6 feet and are quite docile. They are GREAT feeders. Mine is only a psycho only right after he eats, then he strikes at everything. Generally, you should leave any snake alone after they have just eaten! Really, any boa you get, you can't go wrong. There are only a few pythons, that I have an interest in keeping. I have a BP now, and it is quite fussy when it comes to eating. They tend to go off feed for months at a time, which can be a troublesome. I just think that a boa (BCI) is a great starter snake because it allows a new keeper to learn. They are more forgiving with husbandry than alot of other species. I'm not saying it's okay to be lazy, but when your starting off, you tend to make mistakes and forget certain things. If you get your new snake as a baby (let's say even a Colombian BCI), by the time is gets to be 7ft, you will be comfortable with keeping it.
djc3674 is offline  
Login to remove ads
Closed Thread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:47 AM.

Powered by vBulletin®
©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © 2002-17, Hobby Solutions Inc.

right

SEO by vBSEO 3.1.0