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Old 06-19-04, 06:47 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Floridas introduced, Good or Bad?

Many reptiles, mammals and fish have been introduced into florida. Many people see this as horrible, taking away from native species and killing some off. I think of this in two different ways. First off introduced animals can be a problem in some ways,speaking only on reptiles. Take for example the Burmese pythons in the Everglades. Sure burms get big enough to eat some protected wild life and could be potentionally a threat. But how many are really out there, enough to do allot of damage? I mean for a herpers point of view i think of it as awsome we have all these introduced species aslong as it doesnt get out of hand. I mean there are 7 species of anole in florida breeding and established and only one is native( the green anole). An average of 50 species of reptiles are introduced to florida and alittle more than 1/4 are not seen to be breeding yet. I was just wandering what other peoples thoughts are about this. Good or bad? I find it neat to have nile monitors and veiled chameleons in some parts of florida. Sure it can be harmful with some species but how can we prevent it with all the major imports of reptiles coming in to florida each year. Most owners not being able to keep the large reptiles and releasing them. To another point shouldnt we limit the animals coming into the US for this reason, and for not needing the thousands of animals coming in w/c. What is your thought on this? I dont think i really have one yet, looking at all the positives i havnt focused on negatives.
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Old 06-19-04, 07:16 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Well no animals should be let loose in area that they are not native to. Aswell for the people that cant care for there animals and let them loose there are 2 things. 1.this is why you need to consider the full life span of the animal before you buy it. 2. There are enough reptile lovers out there that is for some reason you cant look after them you can always give them to someone that will(for free).

You say that there are lot of herps that have been introduced and are not breeding but how do you know? Just cause you dont see it doesn't mean its not happening. Look at my area, we have massassaga Rattlers but do you ever really see them? NO, but just cause they are rare to find and see doesn't mean they aren't out there.

Over all I think its a bad idea introducing animals were they dont belong. Look at Austraila I believe it was the rabbit that was introduced there and they just took over and ate everything they could .

IMO BAD IDEA.
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Old 06-19-04, 08:02 PM   #3 (permalink)
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How could it be good, at least in natures way of things? It may be neat to see exotic species out your backdoor, but not cool at all. This is why many states here in the US have strict laws about what comes into the state itself. Here in AZ, we are not allowed such things as Crocodilians or Snapper turtles. Reason being, feral pests help wipe out the natural habitat and animal species in those ecosysytems. We also have strict laws concerning the native species which exsist here. It is all about the best thing for the naturals of any place.

I would rather be able to see any animal in its natural setting that have them in my home. Feral pests (including cats and dogs!!) IMO should have strict laws (depending on a few factors), even more so than those placed on native species. They after all, they are more damaging than humans in many cases. We wipe out habitat, they (pests) remove the rest.
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Old 06-19-04, 08:15 PM   #4 (permalink)
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C.m.pyrrhus, i agree totally now. Yes it is cool to see exotic species but what they do to put the ecosytem out of balance is very bad. Still is there anything that can really be done? The anole species are here to stay, but they really dont affect to much. But large poplutions of green iguanas can do quite allot to agricultural areas. The website shows how many species are introduced known to be astablished and just introduced species.http://wld.fwc.state.fl.us/critters/...asp?taxclass=R
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Old 06-19-04, 08:20 PM   #5 (permalink)
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the anoles can do lots. they're already wiping out the native anoles by competing for the same food, and they can spread disease that the animals in florida have never come in contact with before. just a little tiny anole is all it takes.
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Old 06-19-04, 10:43 PM   #6 (permalink)
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There is a small island called Boca Grande about twenty miles south of here where black iguanas thrive. I'm not sure of how they were introduced but there doesn't seem to be any negative effect on other species there.
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Old 06-20-04, 10:06 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Well, here in FL. there are certainly a lot of exotics to deal with. Unfortunately in the past, sometimes the thinking (I hate to use reasoning here) by the feds was to release yet another exotic to control the problem exotic! You could imagine the results. With the herps it has been a little different. The native green anole has been displaced in many areas yet still is dominant in the more pristine areas. These areas are dwindling however. Some predators, notably the native southern black racer, have made due and thrive feeding on the once exotic brown anoles. Many birds also feed on them. I would much rather see the green anoles thriving again, but that's me. As for introduced snakes, there'll be more no doubt found to be actively breeding here too. The discovery of young pythons in the 'glades is troubling, since that might indicate an active breeding pair (or more) I'm sure gators and large wading birds will take their toll on the neos, but once an adult, there's not much to compete with a large python here. With so many native species in peril, the loss of even one from an introduced species is unthinkable.
That said, there's also the problem of introduced species from other parts of the US as well. ( noteably Cal. kings)
This all no doubt plays into the hands of those for a TOTAL BAN on all exotics. PERIOD.
Can't be a good thing for those of us interested in the hobby.
If we don't regulate ourselves, someone will certainly do it for us!

For a dramatic look at what an introduced species can do, just take a look at what the brown snake has done on Guam.
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Old 06-20-04, 11:40 AM   #8 (permalink)
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In some places, it is to late to do much. I know in Minnesota, they have tried a few things to "naturally" take care of the mesquito population by introducing other inverts to do the job. When those plans back-fired (such as the army worms) they introduce another species to eradicate the previous feral inverts. That back fired as well. Now they have several feral and hybrid inverts taking residense within the state now that are ALL producing in huge numbers. They are left with a ton of mesquitos and now feral inverts that are a nuisance. Bigger problem than before they started. This can be seen with other feral animals such as Cane toads in Aussie.

As for what is called "accidental" pests, it is also just a matter of those species survival and adaptation to their new environment. Brown snakes would not last long here in AZ, we just simply could not support them here. Although areas of FLA I know could. This is also seen with bird species in areas of the world. Just something that comes along with exporting goods and animal species, as well as those that have released animals on purpose for reasons unknown. It is just a part of our world these days.
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Old 06-20-04, 10:43 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I say America could use a few more monitors!
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