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Old 02-21-18, 07:33 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Albino Rosy Boa; First Time Snake

Hey guys! Okay so jumping straight in I am about to bring home my first snake in about a few weeks and am trying to get a headstart and prepare everything now so I can adjust it and I have a butt load of questions I can't seem to find answers to and for some reason I don't wanna trust caresheets I wanna see what experienced owners think. Okay backstory out of the way, onward to questions!

I've had a standard 20Gal I bought YEARS ago, its got a mesh top which for the life of me I cannot understand which way is the right way to lock it in. I must be tired, I don't know. I can post pictures of it. Its got locks on the bottom corners and a locking door on the top. I never used a top with my beardie. But I know I HAVE to with a snake. My question is how secure should I try to make this? I've heard some people put textbooks on their tops to prevent escape artists.

Also; the rosy is a hatchling, so I was thinking about just using paper towels for now until they get a bit older per just reading a lot I am seeing thats what people do for easy clean up (haven't found much other reason besides being cheaper also). My concern is more after the hatchling stage; anybody have experience using crushed walnut shells for Rosys? I got my BD when he was 2 and thats what his previous owner used so I continued it (He's almost 4 now), and feed him on it. He digests it pretty well I guess as I've never had an impaction problem and it also holds moisture pretty well for me which is good because I know Rosys can't take humidity but I am not sure if same can go for a snake with the digestion. I know a lot of people use sand but I'd rather use the walnut than the sand or aspen.

Thirdly I was thinking of using heat tape instead of a light bulb because I know the lighting of a lizard is very different from the lighting of a beardie with not needing UVB and all that. Just wanted to see what peoples experience with it was. I live in the desert where it gets 110 degrees in the summer so I am sure the sunlight could keep him warm to help. Lol.

Lastly is feeding. So I checked with the shop they have all the hatchlings eating f/t pinkies right now, I wanted to feed live prey (and I also don't want to move to feed cause that just seems like unecessary stress) so I was wondering if thats a hard switch to make or will they take to it pretty naturally being a boa?

Okay. I'm out of your hair now...Just don't want to make a lot of rookie mistakes if I don't have to. Thanks!
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Old 02-26-18, 07:24 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: Albino Rosy Boa; First Time Snake

Keep in mind Erycines are sand boas, rosy boas are Lichanura. Rosy keepers may be able to more easily find a thread related to your rosy if it's in the correct forum (so rosies would go in the general boa forum). An admin can probably move the thread for you.

I'm not a rosy keeper, but I should be able to help out with general universal questions.

If you could provide a picture of the tank, that would be helpful. Books are not efficient at keeping snakes in, they're generally not heavy enough and if they are you risk having a squished snake. Clips for tanks with tops that sit on it are the best way to secure them, or if you have a sliding tank you can put something in the hole at the front to lock it in place. If you have something else, then seeing it would help.

You should be fine switching to a substrate after a couple of weeks, some bedding should add some security to the tank, and many snakes enjoy burrowing especially while young. I'm not sure on crushed walnuts particularly, but I'd probably hesitate on using them, I'm not sure how well they hold a burrow or how abrasive it is. Aspen is the most common substrate used, the only downfalls are that it molds incredibly easy and has to be changed often and can suck the humidity out of the air and cause problems with shedding. You can spray it to raise humidity, but that may mean you'll have to change it more often unless you use something that can dry it out like a bulb (any lights must be turned off at night - if we can see it they can too) or CHE.

They don't need UVB, but if you were wanting to offer it, they would definitely benefit from it. I'm not knowledgeable on UV though, so I'm unable to offer any advice on that front.

Keep it on f/t. It's safer for the snake, easier on your wallet, and more convenient. A mouse or rat can outgrow your snake within a couple of days or weeks depending on its age if it were ever to refuse, and you can't keep more than one on hand at a time. Pet stores also charge an absolutely ridiculous price for their feeders, and if you're feeding live you have no choice but to use them. If you want an idea of the savings you'll have feeding f/t and buying in bulk...I had 3 snakes a few years ago. One was eating small rats every week or two, one was eating large rats every week or two, and one was eating pinkie mice every week. Just those 3 had a feeding bill of $500/yr or roughly $41/month. When I had 13 snakes, I paid maybe $300-350 a year, and my retic made up nearly half of that. Without her, I could easily have kept costs below $200. Even with just a single snake, you'll save in the long run. You'll have to pay more up front, and the shipping cost may seem high, but you really will save a lot of money.

A baby rosy will likely grow fast, so I'd get maybe one pack each of 2-3 different sizes. Layne Labs offers smaller quantity packages, but since they don't have a flat rate, shipping can be prohibitive depending on where you live. For a single snake, it should be very affordable, it was when I had 8+ that it started to get out of hand. XD Big Cheese and Perfect Prey are also good companies to use, Big Cheese has a flat rate of $29. All 3 vacuum pack their rodents, and as long as you don't open the package or let them thaw, each package can last 1-3 years. If opened, you can keep rodents on hand for a good 6-8 months.

You won't have to move to feed even if you're feeding f/t.
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Old 02-26-18, 06:13 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: Albino Rosy Boa; First Time Snake

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigsnakegirl785 View Post
Keep in mind Erycines are sand boas, rosy boas are Lichanura. Rosy keepers may be able to more easily find a thread related to your rosy if it's in the correct forum (so rosies would go in the general boa forum). An admin can probably move the thread for you.

I'm not a rosy keeper, but I should be able to help out with general universal questions.

If you could provide a picture of the tank, that would be helpful. Books are not efficient at keeping snakes in, they're generally not heavy enough and if they are you risk having a squished snake. Clips for tanks with tops that sit on it are the best way to secure them, or if you have a sliding tank you can put something in the hole at the front to lock it in place. If you have something else, then seeing it would help.

You should be fine switching to a substrate after a couple of weeks, some bedding should add some security to the tank, and many snakes enjoy burrowing especially while young. I'm not sure on crushed walnuts particularly, but I'd probably hesitate on using them, I'm not sure how well they hold a burrow or how abrasive it is. Aspen is the most common substrate used, the only downfalls are that it molds incredibly easy and has to be changed often and can suck the humidity out of the air and cause problems with shedding. You can spray it to raise humidity, but that may mean you'll have to change it more often unless you use something that can dry it out like a bulb (any lights must be turned off at night - if we can see it they can too) or CHE.

They don't need UVB, but if you were wanting to offer it, they would definitely benefit from it. I'm not knowledgeable on UV though, so I'm unable to offer any advice on that front.

Keep it on f/t. It's safer for the snake, easier on your wallet, and more convenient. A mouse or rat can outgrow your snake within a couple of days or weeks depending on its age if it were ever to refuse, and you can't keep more than one on hand at a time. Pet stores also charge an absolutely ridiculous price for their feeders, and if you're feeding live you have no choice but to use them. If you want an idea of the savings you'll have feeding f/t and buying in bulk...I had 3 snakes a few years ago. One was eating small rats every week or two, one was eating large rats every week or two, and one was eating pinkie mice every week. Just those 3 had a feeding bill of $500/yr or roughly $41/month. When I had 13 snakes, I paid maybe $300-350 a year, and my retic made up nearly half of that. Without her, I could easily have kept costs below $200. Even with just a single snake, you'll save in the long run. You'll have to pay more up front, and the shipping cost may seem high, but you really will save a lot of money.

A baby rosy will likely grow fast, so I'd get maybe one pack each of 2-3 different sizes. Layne Labs offers smaller quantity packages, but since they don't have a flat rate, shipping can be prohibitive depending on where you live. For a single snake, it should be very affordable, it was when I had 8+ that it started to get out of hand. XD Big Cheese and Perfect Prey are also good companies to use, Big Cheese has a flat rate of $29. All 3 vacuum pack their rodents, and as long as you don't open the package or let them thaw, each package can last 1-3 years. If opened, you can keep rodents on hand for a good 6-8 months.

You won't have to move to feed even if you're feeding f/t.
Thank you so much! I heard aspen might be best. I was just never a fan of it.
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