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Old 12-11-15, 03:58 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Twitching!

My male cornsnake Aztec has always had this but it's becoming more pronounced. When I first got Aztec he would sometimes twitch the part of his body I was touching towards my fingers. This only happened a few times so I never thought much of it. More recently, though, he will do it whenever I pet him for however long I pet him. He actually squeezed my fingers against the side of his tank today the twitch was so strong. He's not trying to hide or bite, or act aggressive at all. I've read that sometimes cornsnakes twitch when they want to mate, but he doesn't do it when I'm not touching him, and when I do touch him, he only twitches the part of him I'm touching. Does anybody know why he's doing this?
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Old 12-11-15, 05:16 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: Twitching!

Well I read about three hypotesis why they do that: first is mating like you said, the second is that they do that when they are exctited, and third is that they let you know that they are not food, just other snake. I keep mine russians together in one viv, and they do it sometimes when one touch another, they don't panick or mate, observing them I guess it's like the third option, just letting know the other one that "look, I'm not food, I'm snake too!". But I also saw it when I was switching tank and one of my corns went to the tank where still was scent of one of the russians. She immediately started twitching and as she's already adult I guess she wanted to mate...

Well, I really don;t know for sure why they do this
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Old 12-12-15, 05:31 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: Twitching!

That's really interesting. Thanks, Sylphie. c:
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Old 12-12-15, 11:00 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: Twitching!

My female amel corn does that all the time when I touch her, I don't think it is any issue to be concerned about. I don't know what causes it as well, but probably just like how Sylphie said.
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Old 12-12-15, 01:04 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: Twitching!

I agree with Sylphie. Body language and touch are how snakes communicate with each other, since their vocalizations are limited and they can't product facial expressions. I've read a theory that, when mating behavior is not a possibility, snakes push on each other to exert dominance. The twitch response in your case could be a signal of submission. I have some snakes that do the same when I touch them. However, I also have a couple who actually push me back, which I interpret as them refusing to submit and trying to take charge. The individuals who do that have very bold dispositions.
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Old 12-21-15, 12:08 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: Twitching!

They don't really like to be pet. Anything that approaches them from above or touches them on their back makes them feel vulnerable as this is the angle of attack from predators, and this "twitching" is probably his way of saying "shove off you're bugging me". Twitching happens during mating as well, and it is a very distinct kind of movement.
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