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Old 01-07-04, 03:58 PM   #81 (permalink)
Mustangrde1
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Sorry about the link its been messing up all day. try this one.

http://access.adobe.com/perl/convertPDF.pl

Just incase

Note: In the following information, the general terms crocodile/ s refers to all three species of
crocodilian covered in this document. Information about particular species will be stated as
such freshwater crocodile, estuarine crocodile, American alligators or alligators.


In this document, where reference is made to adequate experience, knowledge or
competency, this will be deemed adequate in the opinion of the chief executive of the
Department of Environment and Heritage, on advice of the executive of the Queensland
Wildlife Parks Association.


In this document, reference is made to the Division of Workplace Health and Safety Guide
For The Crocodile Industry. This was produced by the Department of Training and Industrial
Relations under provisions of the Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995 and is administered
by that department.


Husbandry
1.1 Keeper qualifications
A suitably qualified wildlife keeper must be nominated to be in charge of displays, and must
have a demonstrated knowledge of the Division of Workplace Health and Safety Guide For
The Crocodile Industry, and must have the following minimum experience and skills:


(For definitions of hatchling, juvenile, sub-adult and adult crocodiles, see Appendix 3 of the
Division of Workplace Health and Safety Guide For The Crocodile Industry.)
a) To be in charge of hatchlings or juvenile crocodiles, a wildlife keeper must
have:
i) at least 12 months' full-time work with a reptile display and a demonstrated
knowledge of heating and/ or basking requirements, and basic reptile
husbandry;
ii) a knowledge of the relationship between air and water temperatures and
crocodile digestion; and
iii) experience and competency in safe handling methods, minimising danger to
attendants and stress to animals.
b) To be in charge of sub-adult crocodiles, a wildlife keeper must have:
i) at least six months' full-time work with a crocodile display;
ii) experience and competency in heating and/ or basking requirements and
basic reptile husbandry;
iii) a knowledge of the relationship between air and water temperatures and
crocodile digestion;
iv) experience and competency in the capture and transportation procedures for
crocodiles, and a demonstrated knowledge of the safety zones specified in
the Division of Workplace Health and Safety Guide For The Crocodile
Industry.
c) To be in charge of adult crocodiles, a wildlife keeper must have:
i) at least 12 months' full-time work with a crocodile display;
ii) experience and competency in the heating and/ or basking requirements,
basic reptile husbandry and territoriality and aggression in adult crocodiles;
iii) a knowledge of the relationship between air and water temperatures and
crocodile digestion;
iv) a demonstrated ability to identify obese, emaciated or stressed specimens;
and
v) experience and competency in the capture and transportation procedures for
crocodiles, and a demonstrated knowledge of the safety zones specified in
the Division of Workplace Health and Safety Guide For The Crocodile
Industry. 35

6 Demonstrations and handling Wildlife parks play a valuable role in educating their visitors about crocodiles and their
habitat, especially the dangers associated with living in or visiting areas where crocodiles
occur.


a) During a demonstration for the public, a crocodile's natural behavior such as feeding
behavior, thermoregulation, locomotion, mating and nesting should be emphasised
at all times.
b) Hand-feeding of crocodiles of any size for educational shows should be undertaken
only by an accredited wildlife keeper as specified in the Division of Workplace Health
and Safety Guide For The Crocodile Industry.
c) Over-dramatisation and sensationalism of crocodile behaviour has a negative impact
on community perceptions of crocodiles and is not to be undertaken.
d) Basic ecological and biological information is necessary to present an accurate
picture of a crocodile's life history and how it interacts with its environment.
e) Information about the risks associated with living in or visiting a crocodile habitat is
essential to help visitors behave safely.
f) Park visitors should not be presented with examples of inappropriate behaviour that
might be copied by some people. Explain that the presenter is an experienced
handler and that it would be unsafe for a member of the public to copy the actions of
the presenter.
g) Only crocodiles under 1.2m in total length should be used in mobile displays. The
crocodile must at all times be under the supervision of an experienced crocodile
keeper and, when not being used in a demonstration, must be returned to its display
or transport box.
h) At no time can a park visitor be granted access to a crocodile enclosure, or be
permitted to feed a crocodile over a fence. 42
42 Page 43 44
i) Entry to crocodile exhibits by authorised people other than keepers is permitted,
provided the following conditions are observed:
i) In the opinion of the employer, the risk of crocodile attack has been
minimised;
ii) The person is accompanied at all times by a guard;
iii) The person has been instructed in relevant safety issues and has indicated
that the or she understands the instructions and agrees to conform to all safety
directions given by the employer or company representative while in the
enclosure; and
iv) Entry follows all procedures stated in the Division of Workplace Health and
Safety G uide For The Crocodile Industry.


7 Health and safety Refer to the Division of Workplace Health and Safety Guide For The Crocodile Industry.


8 Provisions of other Acts The above exhibit standards of the QWPA are to be taken as the recommended minimum
standards for wildlife parks to achieve, and are not in derogation of the provisions of other
relevant Acts and Regulations including the Nature Conservation Act and Workplace Health
and Safety Act. 43
__________________
Scott Bice
WWW.THEREPTILEROOM.ORG


The worlds most deadly snake is the one you do not see.
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